Sistas On Fire

The Heat Is On!

IS "PRECIOUS" DESTRUCTIVE TO THE BLACK COMMUNITY? WRITER SAYS IT MAKES BLACKS LOOK BAD

THIS IS THE VIEWPOINT OF ANTHONY SMITH AS REPORTED ON THEWRAP.COM:
The central themes in black communities across the U.S. and in Harlem are not ones of incest, rape, teenage pregnancy, physical and m

ental child abuse, obesity, poverty, welfare, illiteracy, and AIDS.
Yet, in marketing the motion picture "Precious: Based on the Novel Push by Sapphire," the producer and director, Lee Daniels boldly affirms that, "I know this chick. You know her. But we just choose not to know her." Rather by choice or circumstance, let me be the first to say that I do not know Precious, and I have a hunch that most other black Americans do not know her, either.

This film is as dangerous as it is offensive, and it is not representative of any community, past or present.

The narrative about a young, unloved victim is intellectually and socially dishonest. Daniels relies on overly objectionable imagery and perverse cinematic devices to provoke emotion from the audience, all the while offering no true explanation of events, no link between cause and effect, no solution and no opportunity to deliberate, just action -- vile, disgusting, and inhumane acts of violence, apathy, abuse and rape.

Moreover, Daniels, similar to the cinematic tendencies of executive producer Tyler Perry, equates light-skinned black characters as friendly, virtuous saviors, working to counteract the ugly, evil, stupid and animal-like dark-skinned characters.

Wow. Read MORE of what writer Anthony Smith has to say, HERE.

*It seems that at this point Mr. Smith's thoughts aren't being shared by too many paying customers. Based on the numbers from this weekend, the demand for the film keeps growing, even though it still hasn't opened nationally yet. Yesterday, it expanded to five more markets; even more next week.

In the meantime, here's what movie maven/blogger Nikki Finke is saying about how well "Precious" is playing at the box office:

Views: 327

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Ok, I am with Mr. Smith on the light skinned vs. dark skinned stereotype, but I must disagree with his statement that: "The central themes in black communities across the U.S. and in Harlem are not ones of incest, rape, teenage pregnancy, physical and mental child abuse, obesity, poverty, welfare, illiteracy, and AIDS."

Firstly, I was not always a professor at Nassau Community College. In my former life, I was a teacher who used to work in several urban communities in NYC. I don't know what's going on in other urban communities, but I do KNOW from FIRST HAND experience that this is EXACTLY what's going on! As you know, I address some of these issues in E-Males because one of my characters (Ebony) is a teacher who works in an anti-proverty program. The character of Johnesha (teen mother, high school drop out, on welfare with twins) is a composite of the female students I used to work with.

Thus, when I read PUSH, the novel by Sapphire that the film is based upon, it resonated with me. I was literally that light skinned teacher! And PUSH gave me the insight and closure I needed on my depressing and heartbreaking experiences. I realized that with many of the girls, what I knew was really just the tip of the iceberg. Underneath the ice lay the real reasons for disruptive behavior and poor academic performance. It wasn't that the girls didn't want to succeed, but that they had been crippled by brutal and debilitating circumstances.

Until we, as African Americans, acknowledge the existence of these pathologies in our communities, they will continue to worsen.

Actually, I was waiting for folks to begin criticizing the movie because it airs our dirty laundry in public. The same thing happened when Alice Walker wrote about incest in The Color Purple...when Shange revealed rape and domestic abuse in For Colored Girls...when Toni Morrison wrote about incest in The Bluest Eye....and we so like to forget how much Angelou was maligned for I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, simply because once white folks embraced her, black people had to take notice of her.

You cannot solve a problem until you acknowledge it!!!!
i saw this movie in the theater. I left the theater feeling angry. Especially with Monique's character. It's like see didin't love her kids and blamws them for her problems. I reaaly became angry at the part where precious bought her kid home and the mom was beating her with the kid in hand. however, i know fmailies (not mothers) are like that. the movi so showing one level of family life.
I think what bothers me the most is that the real power of the book simply does not translate well to film because of the sensational elements you noted, Fabiola.

Fabiola Sully said:
i saw this movie in the theater. I left the theater feeling angry. Especially with Monique's character. It's like see didin't love her kids and blamws them for her problems. I reaaly became angry at the part where precious bought her kid home and the mom was beating her with the kid in hand. however, i know fmailies (not mothers) are like that. the movi so showing one level of family life.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

© 2017   Created by Marcia L. McNair.   Powered by

Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service